Home    Outa Oil

5,000 – 8,000 gallons each --- to last forever

 

1. 5,000 – 8,000 gal

2. jojoba beans

3. shut down’s

4. Olduvai Theory

 

1. I've been wondering about how to get people's attention, since telling them we've got 40 years supply of oil left "at present consumption" just seems to confirm to them that we can be ignored...
>
> How about there is only 5,000 to 8,000 gallons per person left?
>
> Depending on which reports you chose to believe, there is between 840 and 1,200 billion barrels of oil left.  The world population is 6,180,000,000.  Let's see what happens if we distribute all of the oil today.  Each person would receive a shipment of oil, in barrels, somewhere between:
>
>     1,200,000,000,000 / 6,180,000,000  And   840,000,000,000 / 6,180,000,000
>
> Huge numbers, until that is, you press the "=" button on your calculator.  Each human alive today would receive a between 194.17 and 135.92 barrels.  A "barrel" is 42 U.S. gallons, so converted, you would receive between 8155 and 5708 gallons.   Your oil would fit in an above ground 5' deep, 15' diameter  swimming pool.  That's it.  That's your personal share.  It is now up to you to decide what to do with it.  If you need more, perhaps you can trade for it, or arrange to buy it from someone who doesn't use it, it's all up to you.  You can keep burning it as you have, and when you run out, you can sit alone, cold,  in the dark, and wonder where you'll get your next meal.
>
> Or you can use your share to build a home, and a lifestyle that makes sense, so you can continue to be relatively comfortable once you run out.  Decide.  For more information, examine the webpages at www.runningonempty.org and www.dieoff.com.

 

I knew that building a house requires about 7,500 gallons of
gasoline, but I didn't realize that the remaining ration of oil would
be totally used up by that.
>

 


Mr. Knight and others responded to denuding of Sahara grasslands:
<...the Sahara was rich grassland 8000 years ago. Millennia of grazing (goat
herds), eventually denuded the land such that the topsoil blew away and the
underlying sand was exposed. ...>
I'm impressed that in a group of 350, that ROE has so many people (at least
four) that recognize the Sahara syndrome. I'm even more amazed that more
haven't put in their $0.02 about how to avoid future saharas.

What did mankind learn from denuding the Sahara? How do we apply those
lessons learned to ROE? Can the Sahara be restored to grassland? In satellite
views, there are several bright spots in the Sahara, probably vent flares
from oil fields. I submit that global action is needed to harvest the flare
gas and use it to "reforest" the Sahara. Can we prevent the denuding of the
Amazon?
Top


2. The US has a project to grow jojoba beans or guaule (why yule?) or creosote
bushes on native American Indian desert lands as a source of fuel and
chemical feedstock. We do need to focus on useable plants. Non THC hemp would provide clothes and much fiber.

Top

 

3. Shutdowns

 

Dec 12,2000

According to Bloomberg the rising cost of natural gas has caused
Sioux City, Iowa-based fertilizer maker Terra Industries Inc. to shut
down one of two ammonia plants in Verdigris, Oklahoma.

California Paper Mills Shut DOWN

                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------

Energy crisis darkens S.J. paper mills to temporarily shut due to natural-gas prices By Liz Benston

Record Staff Writer

San Joaquin County's two major paper manufacturers will shut down for a limited period due to spiking natural-gas prices.

Officials for Newark Sierra Paperboard Corp. in Stockton and Fox River Paper Co. in Ripon said they could no longer afford to pay for natural gas, which the mills primarily use to power paper-drying equipment.

Most of Newark Sierra's 135 or so employees will be laid off next week, when most of the plant will be offline, general manager Mark Vincent said. But some of the plant will be up again the week of Dec. 18, and he expects it to be fully operational again Jan. 2.

Fox River mill manager Pat Mickelson said a "significant" number of the plant's roughly 160 workers will be let go through the end of the year.

It will shut down its giant paper machine, but other services, such as maintenance, shipping and distribution services, will remain open, he said.

Last week, Shasta Paper Co., one of Shasta County's largest employers, announced it would close Monday for at least a week because of soaring gas prices. Almost all of the plant's 460 workers would be laid off until gas prices drop, the company said.

Officials at both San Joaquin County facilities say the shutdowns will be curtailed because they are hopeful prices will fall over the next few weeks.

"We can't walk away from our customers for extended periods and expect them to be there," Vincent added. "We need to take care of our key customers."

Limited pipeline capacity, a decline in natural-gas reserves and soaring demand has pushed natural-gas prices into the stratosphere, experts say.

Paper mills are large natural-gas users in winter months, a time when other industries are less active. And many buy gas on what's known as the daily spot market, a free-for-all where prices have risen from about $3 per million British thermal units to more than $8. In futures trading Thursday, January contracts settled down 11.2 cents, to $8.373, on the NYMEX.

"We were flabbergasted at $6 for (natural gas)," Vincent said. "This is not the end of this. This is just the beginning."

Vincent and Mickelson declined to reveal what they currently pay for natural gas.

Newark Sierra, which uses recycled materials to make paperboard products, gets its natural gas from a third party, out-of-state marketer. Fox River, which makes writing and printing paper, obtains power from a nearby co-generation plant owned by another company.

"It's an energy crisis is what it boils down to," added Gene Hain, vice president of the Association of Western Pulp & Paper Workers union in Portland, Ore.

Hain said the union is trying to gather a coalition of other unions and industries to try and meet with regulators and other agencies to address the problem.

Representatives of the union's Local 320 in Stockton, which represents Newark Sierra employees, could not be reached for comment Thursday.

The gas-price spike, combined with an increase in electricity costs, will affect a broader segment of industrial users than just paper mills, Hain said.

"You're going to see it affecting a lot of food processing that uses considerable amounts of energy. You're going to see them realize that they're going to have to raise the price of their products considerably or shut down until this energy crisis is over."

http://www.recordnet.com/daily/news/articles/12news120800.html

 California Paper Mills Shut DOWN

Energy crisis darkens S.J. paper mills to temporarily shut due to natural-gas prices By Liz Benston

Record Staff Writer

San Joaquin County's two major paper manufacturers will shut down for a limited period due to spiking natural-gas prices.

Officials for Newark Sierra Paperboard Corp. in Stockton and Fox River Paper Co. in Ripon said they could no longer afford to pay for natural gas, which the mills primarily use to power paper-drying equipment.

Most of Newark Sierra's 135 or so employees will be laid off next week, when most of the plant will be offline, general manager Mark Vincent said. But some of the plant will be up again the week of Dec. 18, and he expects it to be fully operational again Jan. 2.

Fox River mill manager Pat Mickelson said a "significant" number of the plant's roughly 160 workers will be let go through the end of the year.

It will shut down its giant paper machine, but other services, such as maintenance, shipping and distribution services, will remain open, he said.

Last week, Shasta Paper Co., one of Shasta County's largest employers, announced it would close Monday for at least a week because of soaring gas prices. Almost all of the plant's 460 workers would be laid off until gas prices drop, the company said.

Officials at both San Joaquin County facilities say the shutdowns will be curtailed because they are hopeful prices will fall over the next few weeks.

"We can't walk away from our customers for extended periods and expect them to be there," Vincent added. "We need to take care of our key customers."

Limited pipeline capacity, a decline in natural-gas reserves and soaring demand has pushed natural-gas prices into the stratosphere, experts say.

Paper mills are large natural-gas users in winter months, a time when other industries are less active. And many buy gas on what's known as the daily spot market, a free-for-all where prices have risen from about $3 per million British thermal units to more than $8. In futures trading Thursday, January contracts settled down 11.2 cents, to $8.373, on the NYMEX.

"We were flabbergasted at $6 for (natural gas)," Vincent said. "This is not the end of this. This is just the beginning."

Vincent and Mickelson declined to reveal what they currently pay for natural gas.

Newark Sierra, which uses recycled materials to make paperboard products, gets its natural gas from a third party, out-of-state marketer. Fox River, which makes writing and printing paper, obtains power from a nearby co-generation plant owned by another company.

"It's an energy crisis is what it boils down to," added Gene Hain, vice president of the Association of Western Pulp & Paper Workers union in Portland, Ore.

Hain said the union is trying to gather a coalition of other unions and industries to try and meet with regulators and other agencies to address the problem.

Representatives of the union's Local 320 in Stockton, which represents Newark Sierra employees, could not be reached for comment Thursday.

The gas-price spike, combined with an increase in electricity costs, will affect a broader segment of industrial users than just paper mills, Hain said.

"You're going to see it affecting a lot of food processing that uses considerable amounts of energy. You're going to see them realize that they're going to have to raise the price of their products considerably or shut down until this energy crisis is over."

http://www.recordnet.com/daily/news/articles/12news120800.html

 California Paper Mills Shut DOWN

Energy crisis darkens S.J. paper mills to temporarily shut due to natural-gas prices By Liz Benston

Record Staff Writer

San Joaquin County's two major paper manufacturers will shut down for a limited period due to spiking natural-gas prices.

Officials for Newark Sierra Paperboard Corp. in Stockton and Fox River Paper Co. in Ripon said they could no longer afford to pay for natural gas, which the mills primarily use to power paper-drying equipment.

Most of Newark Sierra's 135 or so employees will be laid off next week, when most of the plant will be offline, general manager Mark Vincent said. But some of the plant will be up again the week of Dec. 18, and he expects it to be fully operational again Jan. 2.

Fox River mill manager Pat Mickelson said a "significant" number of the plant's roughly 160 workers will be let go through the end of the year.

It will shut down its giant paper machine, but other services, such as maintenance, shipping and distribution services, will remain open, he said.

Last week, Shasta Paper Co., one of Shasta County's largest employers, announced it would close Monday for at least a week because of soaring gas prices. Almost all of the plant's 460 workers would be laid off until gas prices drop, the company said.

Officials at both San Joaquin County facilities say the shutdowns will be curtailed because they are hopeful prices will fall over the next few weeks.

"We can't walk away from our customers for extended periods and expect them to be there," Vincent added. "We need to take care of our key customers."

Limited pipeline capacity, a decline in natural-gas reserves and soaring demand has pushed natural-gas prices into the stratosphere, experts say.

Paper mills are large natural-gas users in winter months, a time when other industries are less active. And many buy gas on what's known as the daily spot market, a free-for-all where prices have risen from about $3 per million British thermal units to more than $8. In futures trading Thursday, January contracts settled down 11.2 cents, to $8.373, on the NYMEX.

"We were flabbergasted at $6 for (natural gas)," Vincent said. "This is not the end of this. This is just the beginning."

Vincent and Mickelson declined to reveal what they currently pay for natural gas.

Newark Sierra, which uses recycled materials to make paperboard products, gets its natural gas from a third party, out-of-state marketer. Fox River, which makes writing and printing paper, obtains power from a nearby co-generation plant owned by another company.

"It's an energy crisis is what it boils down to," added Gene Hain, vice president of the Association of Western Pulp & Paper Workers union in Portland, Ore.

Hain said the union is trying to gather a coalition of other unions and industries to try and meet with regulators and other agencies to address the problem.

Representatives of the union's Local 320 in Stockton, which represents Newark Sierra employees, could not be reached for comment Thursday.

The gas-price spike, combined with an increase in electricity costs, will affect a broader segment of industrial users than just paper mills, Hain said.

"You're going to see it affecting a lot of food processing that uses considerable amounts of energy. You're going to see them realize that they're going to have to raise the price of their products considerably or shut down until this energy crisis is over."

http://www.recordnet.com/daily/news/articles/12news120800.html

 

For more information, examine the webpages at www.runningonempty.org and www.dieoff.com.

 

 

 

Top